Physical well-being

What does and does not matter?

You wake up in the morning, look into the mirror, and think that you don’t like how your body looks. It’s the New Years and one of your resolutions or goals is to lose some weight and “look better”. You then go to your local gym, buy a monthly pass, and start a new healthy popular diet.

After a week, there is a realisation: your body still looks the same in the mirror. So you start losing a little motivation and going to the gym less. Eating healthy seems a bit more difficult. Don’t worry, we have all been there.

What is physical well-being?

In today’s modern world, we often see magazines with popular diets, or ads that showcase abs. However, do those features imply physical well-being? 

Scientifically, physical well-being is defined as: “the ability to perform physical activities and carry out social roles that are not hindered by physical limitations and experiences of bodily pain, and biological health indicators.”

Or simply put, the fulfillment of day-to-day activities without being limited by our bodies. So no, beauty does not equal physical health. It is still worth it to get up, go to the gym and buy a monthly pass. The better question here is: what can we do to be physically healthier? 

Sleep is not overrated

Remember those times when we hated to sleep in kindergarten? Well, as much as we disliked that, it was very necessary. Even in adulthood, it’s still one of the most significant contributors to physical health. 

Sleep is important because it helps to maintain the balance of our hormones, such as insulin. Insulin is crucial for controlling blood pressure, and not sleeping enough can therefore result in high blood pressure, and the long-term consequence includes diabetes. 

Our immune system is also dependent on a good night’s sleep, because this system is responsible for fighting off infections. Ultimately, sleep is critical for our quality of life and safety. 

You Are What You Put in Your Body?

What food you put in your body is important and is going to have an effect on your physical well-being. It is crucial to have a balanced diet, with healthy fats (e.g. avocados or fish), reduced sodium (salt) and sugar intake, but increased vegetable, fruit and calcium intake (e.g. beans or soya drinks). 

While paying attention to what you eat is a great first step, a second step to consider is how you cook the food. For instance, it can be a good idea to boil or steam your veggies rather than frying them or instead of using butter, you could try sunflower oil. 

Not looking after your food intakes can cause serious health issues, such diabetes, obesity or cardiovascular conditions. 

Physical exercise is popular for a reason

This one is an oldie but a goodie. By now, physical exercise is probably a pretty cliché topic, but that is for a reason. In our modern world, we live quite the sedentary life with sitting in front of a desk, public transportations and while watching TV. 

Exercising has very clear immediate benefits that might be noticeable. For example, it can reduce short-term feelings of anxiety and it can help you make better judgements, learn fast and sleep better. Long-term consequences can be less visible, but it can slow the loss of bone density and build up muscles. 

Otherwise, physical exercise reduces the chance of various conditions: arthritis, type II diabetes, hip fractures, cardiovascular disease and cancer. 

The benefits of exercising are clear and it’s a significant factor of being healthy. And it’s not as difficult as one might think. We only need to be active for 150 minutes per week, so if we do the math, that’s 30 minutes, for 5 days! This might be a good time to get those fancy fitness outfits out and feel fantastic when exercising! 

What have we learned

Dieting and ‘good-looking’ bodies are being advertised so much in the popular media, that we are eager to make changes on the outside. 

But as countless research has shown, physical health is actually more about sleep, nutrition and physical exercise. Ultimately, these are the factors that are going to fight infections, lower the risks of diabetes, prevent cardiovascular diseases and reduce short-term feelings of anxiety. 

It’s important to mention however, that well-being has a holistic approach, where physical health is just one factor out of three. We covered mental well-being on our blog too, for those of you who might be interested. 

Keywords: physical health, improving physical health, holistic approach, sleep, exercise, nutrition, effects of poor physical health

Share this blog with your online network!

Physical well-being

We have all been there, haven’t we?

You wake up in the morning, look into the mirror, and think that you don’t like how your body looks. It’s the New Years and one of your resolutions or goals is to lose some weight and “look better”. You then go to your local gym, buy a monthly pass, and start a new healthy popular diet.

After a week, there is a realisation: your body still looks the same in the mirror. So you start losing a little motivation and going to the gym less. Eating healthy seems a bit more difficult. Don’t worry, we have all been there.

What is physical well-being?

In today’s modern world, we often see magazines with popular diets, or ads that showcase abs. However, do those features imply physical well-being? 

Scientifically, physical well-being is defined as: “the ability to perform physical activities and carry out social roles that are not hindered by physical limitations and experiences of bodily pain, and biological health indicators.”

Or simply put, the fulfillment of day-to-day activities without being limited by our bodies. So no, beauty does not equal physical health. It is still worth it to get up, go to the gym and buy a monthly pass. The better question here is: what can we do to be physically healthier? 

Sleep is not overrated

Remember those times when we hated to sleep in kindergarten? Well, as much as we disliked that, it was very necessary. Even in adulthood, it’s still one of the most significant contributors to physical health. 

Sleep is important because it helps to maintain the balance of our hormones, such as insulin. Insulin is crucial for controlling blood pressure, and not sleeping enough can therefore result in high blood pressure, and the long-term consequence includes diabetes. 

Our immune system is also dependent on a good night’s sleep, because this system is responsible for fighting off infections. Ultimately, sleep is critical for our quality of life and safety. 

You Are What You Put in Your Body?

What food you put in your body is important and is going to have an effect on your physical well-being. It is crucial to have a balanced diet, with healthy fats (e.g. avocados or fish), reduced sodium (salt) and sugar intake, but increased vegetable, fruit and calcium intake (e.g. beans or soya drinks). 

While paying attention to what you eat is a great first step, a second step to consider is how you cook the food. For instance, it can be a good idea to boil or steam your veggies rather than frying them or instead of using butter, you could try sunflower oil. 

Not looking after your food intakes can cause serious health issues, such diabetes, obesity or cardiovascular conditions. 

Physical exercise is popular for a reason

This one is an oldie but a goodie. By now, physical exercise is probably a pretty cliché topic, but that is for a reason. In our modern world, we live quite the sedentary life with sitting in front of a desk, public transportations and while watching TV. 

Exercising has very clear immediate benefits that might be noticeable. For example, it can reduce short-term feelings of anxiety and it can help you make better judgements, learn fast and sleep better. Long-term consequences can be less visible, but it can slow the loss of bone density and build up muscles. 

Otherwise, physical exercise reduces the chance of various conditions: arthritis, type II diabetes, hip fractures, cardiovascular disease and cancer. 

The benefits of exercising are clear and it’s a significant factor of being healthy. And it’s not as difficult as one might think. We only need to be active for 150 minutes per week, so if we do the math, that’s 30 minutes, for 5 days! This might be a good time to get those fancy fitness outfits out and feel fantastic when exercising! 

What have we learned

Dieting and ‘good-looking’ bodies are being advertised so much in the popular media, that we are eager to make changes on the outside. 

But as countless research has shown, physical health is actually more about sleep, nutrition and physical exercise. Ultimately, these are the factors that are going to fight infections, lower the risks of diabetes, prevent cardiovascular diseases and reduce short-term feelings of anxiety. 

It’s important to mention however, that well-being has a holistic approach, where physical health is just one factor out of three. We covered mental well-being on our blog too, for those of you who might be interested. 

Keywords: physical health, improving physical health, holistic approach, sleep, exercise, nutrition, effects of poor physical health

Share this blog with your online network!

Get to know us

Wanna chat? Contact us at
info@well-you.com

Get to know us

Wanna chat? Contact us at
info@well-you.com

Get to know us

Wanna chat? Contact us at
info@well-you.com