6 science-backed self-care ideas

you can do at home

self-care

We are currently living in unprecedented times, where you might experience a myriad of emotions, including some not-so-positive ones. During the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19), we are encouraged to stay at home to prevent the spread. Although many of us may be going crazy from being cooped up all day, the situation has presented itself with an unexpected gift – time for ourselves. 

We are worried about our loved ones around us, and self-care is probably the last thing on our minds, but it is essential for our well-being. To take care of the people we love, we first have to take good care of ourselves. It’s more important than ever to be kind to yourself and make self-care a priority.

 What does “self-care” mean exactly?

Self-care is defined as “the act of caring for oneself.” Although this might sound overly simplified, self-care is the activities and practices we do to care for our mind, body, and soul.

It involves completely focusing on what you want at the moment and not what others expect from you. And no, it is not selfish as it is knowing what you need to take care of yourself. Practicing self-care improves your productivity, stress management, and enables you to be your all-around happiest self. 

There are many different ways to practice self-care such as exercise, sleep, healthy eating, or taking a long bath. Here are 6 self-care ideas you can do at home. 

1.Keep your mind active

When it comes to health, we are told to take care of our hearts, liver, kidneys but taking care of your brain is equally important. A healthy brain will help your mind to stay alert, active, and help to promote good mental health.

 One of the most effective brain exercises is meditation. Many scientific studies have proven the positive effects that meditation can have on our mental well-being. To be mindful, we have to bring our focus to the present and pay attention to what is happening in our mind and body. Want to reduce stress and increase productivity and efficiency? Present moment awareness is the answer.

According to the Cleveland Clinic, there are several different types, from mindfulness meditation to concentration meditation to using mantras, and all can result in deep relaxation. Guided meditations, like those offered by meditation apps, is always a good place to start. 

meditation

2. Switch up your home environment

Now that we are advised to stay at home, we are spending most of our time indoors. When considering improving our health we tend to focus on eating healthy, exercise and sleep. These factors are important but since we spend most of our time at home, it is essential that we also consider our environment and its impact on our health and well-being. A study in the Journal of Environmental Psychology states that a clean space is a key to maintaining positive relationships, reducing stress, and promoting overall well-being. 

Did you know that pollutants can accumulate in your house can pose health problems? Light and fresh air play a significant part in creating a healthy home. By opening your windows and pulling back the curtains, you are allowing natural light and fresh air to replace those pollutants. 

Another way to create a healthier home is to declutter and organize. Clutter can steal your time, space, energy, and peace and can change the way you feel.  Declutter can be liberating as clear out distractions. If decluttering is a challenge for you – like most of us, we would suggest trying Marie Kondo’s tidying method. It is a great way to determine what sparks joy in your life and removing what doesn’t. 

3. Get your craft on 

As children, we all had art as a subject that encouraged self-expression and creativity. As we got older, we hung up the markers and watercolor pants and convinced ourselves that we weren’t artistic – something not required for self-expression. Creative projects engage the brain on multiple levels such as memory and problem-solving skills.  Studies show that the levels of cortisol, a stress-related hormone, drastically drop when we spend time making art. Artistic or not, we all deal with stress. Perhaps it’s time we start to explore arts and crafts as a form of self-care.

craft and creativity

There are simple ways in which we can make it part of our daily lives such as using a coloring book, painting or even starting a mini-project like making a photo album.  

4. Start journaling

Journaling is an incredible self-care practice. Life can sometimes seem chaotic and journaling can help organize these feelings. Journaling reduces stress, clarifies thoughts and feelings, and ultimately makes you more aware of who you are as a person. The simple act of describing one’s feelings helps people to clear their minds.

 The only challenge with journaling is starting. Some people find it easier to begin writing when they are given a prompt. If you consider yourself one of these people, we already created a gratitude journal  that can help you get started.

Journaling is probably one of the easiest self-care practices once you have a routine down. It will be most effective if you do it 20 minutes daily. Journaling is not for being critical. Don’t worry about grammar errors and punctuation. It’s just you and words. Look at writing as “me” time to unwind and destress. 

exercise

5. Boost those endorphins

When we exercise, hormones such as endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine. These hormones have a positive effect on our mood but also our general well-being and mental health. Mayo Clinic states that regular exercise can improve our physical health, decrease our risk for serious health conditions, and help us feel better emotionally. 

For many of us, our lives are so full that we don’t know how to add exercise into our already busy days. And when that time does come around, we dread it. The key is to make it fun! Find ways to enjoy exercise and make it fit into your lifestyle.  Exercise doesn’t have to be difficult circuits that have you fighting for your life. It can be you dancing around your home or going for a walk around the block. 

 

6. Stay virtually connected

As regulations have us keeping our distance physically, we may begin to feel lonely and anxious. However, staying virtually connected gives us many ways to cope with social distancing. 

If cultural activities are something you miss, spend a few hours at the museum. This may seem impossible but many museums are now offering virtual tours.  Research shows that engaging with museums provides positive social experiences, reduced social isolation opportunities for learning and acquiring new skills which decrease anxiety and increased optimism, hope, and enjoyment. 

Here are some of the best virtual tours of museums: 

If museums aren’t your thing, or you miss meeting strangers, you’re not alone. Why not try online workshops and events? They are a great tool to meet new people while working on yourself. If searching for the right one is a problem, try one of our series of events that are focused on helping you take care of your body, mind, and social connections. Whether it’s a guided meditation, yoga class, or upgrading the interpersonal skills you’re after, online events make staying in good physical and mental shape easy when staying home.

virtually connected

Let’s be real

We may not be able to do all these things every day. However, if we make self-care a goal and make time for it regularly, we will feel and function better. There is no right or wrong way to care for yourself, as long as it contributes to your happiness and well-being.

Keywords: self-care, self-love, self-development, self-compassion, journaling, physical health, staying virtually connected, self-care at home, meditation

  • Chatterjee, H. J., & Camic, P. M. (2015). The health and well-being potential of museums and art galleries. Arts & Health, 7(3), 183–186. https://doi.org/10.1080/17533015.2015.1065594
  • Cleveland Clinic. (2018). Meditation. Cleveland Clinic. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/17906-meditation
  • Heijnen, S., Hommel, B., Kibele, A., & Colzato, L. S. (2016). Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review. Frontiers in Psychology, 6. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01890
  • Kaimal, G., Ray, K., & Muniz, J. (2016). Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants’ Responses Following Art Making. Art Therapy, 33(2), 74–80. https://doi.org/10.1080/07421656.2016.1166832
  • Mayo Clinic. (2017). Depression and anxiety: Exercise eases symptoms. Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/depression-and-exercise/art-20046495
  • Roster, C. A., Ferrari, J. R., & Peter Jurkat, M. (2016). The dark side of home: Assessing possession ‘clutter’ on subjective well-being. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 46, 32–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvp.2016.03.003
  • Watson, L. R., Fraser, M., & Ballas, P. (n.d.). Journaling for Mental Health—Health Encyclopedia [Health Encyclopedia]. University of Rochester Medical Center. Retrieved 9 December 2020, from https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentID=4552&ContentTypeID=1

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6 science-backed self-care ideas you can do at home

self-care

We are currently living in unprecedented times, where you might experience a myriad of emotions, including some not-so-positive ones. During the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19), we are encouraged to stay at home to prevent the spread. Although many of us may be going crazy from being cooped up all day, the situation has presented itself with an unexpected gift – time for ourselves. 

We are worried about our loved ones around us, and self-care is probably the last thing on our minds, but it is essential for our well-being. To take care of the people we love, we first have to take good care of ourselves. It’s more important than ever to be kind to yourself and make self-care a priority.

 What does “self-care” mean exactly?

Self-care is defined as “the act of caring for oneself.” Although this might sound overly simplified, self-care is the activities and practices we do to care for our mind, body, and soul.

It involves completely focusing on what you want at the moment and not what others expect from you. And no, it is not selfish as it is knowing what you need to take care of yourself. Practicing self-care improves your productivity, stress management, and enables you to be your all-around happiest self. 

There are many different ways to practice self-care such as exercise, sleep, healthy eating, or taking a long bath. Here are 6 self-care ideas you can do at home. 

1.Keep your mind active

When it comes to health, we are told to take care of our hearts, liver, kidneys but taking care of your brain is equally important. A healthy brain will help your mind to stay alert, active, and help to promote good mental health.

 One of the most effective brain exercises is meditation. Many scientific studies have proven the positive effects that meditation can have on our mental well-being. To be mindful, we have to bring our focus to the present and pay attention to what is happening in our mind and body. Want to reduce stress and increase productivity and efficiency? Present moment awareness is the answer.

According to the Cleveland Clinic, there are several different types, from mindfulness meditation to concentration meditation to using mantras, and all can result in deep relaxation. Guided meditations, like those offered by meditation apps, is always a good place to start. 

meditation

2. Switch up your home environment

Now that we are advised to stay at home, we are spending most of our time indoors. When considering improving our health we tend to focus on eating healthy, exercise and sleep. These factors are important but since we spend most of our time at home, it is essential that we also consider our environment and its impact on our health and well-being. A study in the Journal of Environmental Psychology states that a clean space is a key to maintaining positive relationships, reducing stress, and promoting overall well-being. 

Did you know that pollutants can accumulate in your house can pose health problems? Light and fresh air play a significant part in creating a healthy home. By opening your windows and pulling back the curtains, you are allowing natural light and fresh air to replace those pollutants. 

Another way to create a healthier home is to declutter and organize. Clutter can steal your time, space, energy, and peace and can change the way you feel.  Declutter can be liberating as clear out distractions. If decluttering is a challenge for you – like most of us, we would suggest trying Marie Kondo’s tidying method. It is a great way to determine what sparks joy in your life and removing what doesn’t. 

3. Get your craft on 

As children, we all had art as a subject that encouraged self-expression and creativity. As we got older, we hung up the markers and watercolor pants and convinced ourselves that we weren’t artistic – something not required for self-expression. Creative projects engage the brain on multiple levels such as memory and problem-solving skills.  Studies show that the levels of cortisol, a stress-related hormone, drastically drop when we spend time making art. Artistic or not, we all deal with stress. Perhaps it’s time we start to explore arts and crafts as a form of self-care.

craft and creativity

There are simple ways in which we can make it part of our daily lives such as using a coloring book, painting or even starting a mini-project like making a photo album.  

4. Start journaling

Journaling is an incredible self-care practice. Life can sometimes seem chaotic and journaling can help organize these feelings. Journaling reduces stress, clarifies thoughts and feelings, and ultimately makes you more aware of who you are as a person. The simple act of describing one’s feelings helps people to clear their minds.

 The only challenge with journaling is starting. Some people find it easier to begin writing when they are given a prompt. If you consider yourself one of these people, we already created a gratitude journal  that can help you get started.

Journaling is probably one of the easiest self-care practices once you have a routine down. It will be most effective if you do it 20 minutes daily. Journaling is not for being critical. Don’t worry about grammar errors and punctuation. It’s just you and words. Look at writing as “me” time to unwind and destress. 

exercise

5. Boost those endorphins

When we exercise, hormones such as endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine. These hormones have a positive effect on our mood but also our general well-being and mental health. Mayo Clinic states that regular exercise can improve our physical health, decrease our risk for serious health conditions, and help us feel better emotionally. 

For many of us, our lives are so full that we don’t know how to add exercise into our already busy days. And when that time does come around, we dread it. The key is to make it fun! Find ways to enjoy exercise and make it fit into your lifestyle.  Exercise doesn’t have to be difficult circuits that have you fighting for your life. It can be you dancing around your home or going for a walk around the block. 

 

6. Stay virtually connected

As regulations have us keeping our distance physically, we may begin to feel lonely and anxious. However, staying virtually connected gives us many ways to cope with social distancing. 

If cultural activities are something you miss, spend a few hours at the museum. This may seem impossible but many museums are now offering virtual tours.  Research shows that engaging with museums provides positive social experiences, reduced social isolation opportunities for learning and acquiring new skills which decrease anxiety and increased optimism, hope, and enjoyment. 

Here are some of the best virtual tours of museums: 

If museums aren’t your thing, or you miss meeting strangers, you’re not alone. Why not try online workshops and events? They are a great tool to meet new people while working on yourself. If searching for the right one is a problem, try one of our series of events that are focused on helping you take care of your body, mind, and social connections. Whether it’s a guided meditation, yoga class, or upgrading the interpersonal skills you’re after, online events make staying in good physical and mental shape easy when staying home.

virtually connected

Let’s be real

We may not be able to do all these things every day. However, if we make self-care a goal and make time for it regularly, we will feel and function better. There is no right or wrong way to care for yourself, as long as it contributes to your happiness and well-being.

Keywords: self-care, self-love, self-development, self-compassion, journaling, physical health, staying virtually connected, self-care at home, meditation

  • Chatterjee, H. J., & Camic, P. M. (2015). The health and well-being potential of museums and art galleries. Arts & Health, 7(3), 183–186. https://doi.org/10.1080/17533015.2015.1065594
  • Cleveland Clinic. (2018). Meditation. Cleveland Clinic. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/17906-meditation
  • Heijnen, S., Hommel, B., Kibele, A., & Colzato, L. S. (2016). Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review. Frontiers in Psychology, 6. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01890
  • Kaimal, G., Ray, K., & Muniz, J. (2016). Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants’ Responses Following Art Making. Art Therapy, 33(2), 74–80. https://doi.org/10.1080/07421656.2016.1166832
  • Mayo Clinic. (2017). Depression and anxiety: Exercise eases symptoms. Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/depression-and-exercise/art-20046495
  • Roster, C. A., Ferrari, J. R., & Peter Jurkat, M. (2016). The dark side of home: Assessing possession ‘clutter’ on subjective well-being. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 46, 32–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvp.2016.03.003
  • Watson, L. R., Fraser, M., & Ballas, P. (n.d.). Journaling for Mental Health—Health Encyclopedia [Health Encyclopedia]. University of Rochester Medical Center. Retrieved 9 December 2020, from https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentID=4552&ContentTypeID=1

More from wellyou

The anti-inflammatory effects of exercise

How exactly does it achieve all this, you may be wondering? One of the answers lies in reducing inflammation. So what is inflammation of the body? And how does exercise affect it? Let’s take a closer look…

Get to know us

Wanna chat? Contact us at

Get to know us

Wanna chat? Contact us at
info@well-you.com

Get to know us

Wanna chat? Contact us at
info@well-you.com